October in Women’s History

October Highlights in U.S. Women’s History

• October 3, 1904 – Mary McLeod Bethune opens her first school for African-American students in Daytona Beach, Florida
• October 4, 1976 – Barbara Walters becomes the first woman co-anchor of the evening news (at ABC)
• October 4, 1993 – Ruth Bader Ginsburg joins the U.S. Supreme Court as its second woman Justice
• October 8, 1993 – Toni Morrison becomes the first African American woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature
• October 10, 1983 – Dr. Barbara McClintock receives the Nobel Prize for Medicine for her discovery in genetics about mobile genetic elements
• October 11, 1984 – Dr. Kathryn D. Sullivan is the first U.S. woman astronaut to “walk” in space during Challenger flight
• October 15, 1948 – Dr. Frances L. Willoughby is the first woman doctor in the regular U.S. Navy
• October 16, 1916 – Margaret Sanger opens the U.S.’s first birth control clinic in Brooklyn, New York
• October 23, 1910 – Blanche Stuart Scott is the first American woman pilot to make a public flight
• October 24, 1956 – Reverend Margaret Towner is the first woman ordained a minister in the Presbyterian Church
• October 28, 1958 – Mary Roebling is the first woman director of a stock exchange (American Stock Exchange)

October Birthdays
• October 1, 1921 (1998) – Margaret Hillis, founded the Tanglewood Alumni Chorus (1950) and the Chicago Symphony Chorus, replaced Conductor Solti in directing Mahler’s Eighth Symphony (1977)
• October 1, 1935 – Dame Julie Andrews, versatile film and stage actress, won an academy award for “Mary Poppins” (1954)
• October 2, 1895 (1990) – Ruth Streeter, when Marines recruited women she became a colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve (1943), recruited men and women for active service
• October 2, 1912 (1980) – Alice Bourneuf, economist, worked on the Marshall Plan to help Europe after World War II, taught economics at Boston College (1959-77)
• October 2, 1919 (1997) – Shirley Clarke, filmmaker, produced avant-garde films in 1950s and 60s including “Robert Frost: A Lover’s Quarrel with the World,” which won an academy award for best feature documentary
• October 3, 1897 (1982) – Ruth Bronson, Bureau of Indian Affairs official who got loans for Indian students, National Congress of American Indians forced authorities to honor treaties (1944), wrote Indians are People, Too
• October 4, 1908 (1995) – Eleanor Flexner, influential author and historian, wrote Century of Struggle: The Women’s Rights Movement in the United States (1950) and Mary Wollstonecraft: A Biography (1972)
• October 5, 1959 – Maya Lin, artist and architect of the Vietnam Memorial in Washington D.C. (1980-82) and other public sculptures, author of Boundaries (2000)
• October 6, 1905 (1998) – Helen Wills Moody, dominated American women’s tennis in the 1920s and 30s with 8 Wimbledon titles and 7 U.S. singles titles
• October 6, 1914 (1997) – Mary Louise Smith, Republican Party committeewoman and chair (1974-77), supporter of ERA and pro-choice
• October 6, 1917 (1977) – Fannie Lou Hamer, civil rights leader and voting rights crusader, helped organize the Mississippi Freedom Summer (1964)
• October 7, 1913 (2005) – Elizabeth Janeway, social analyst of 20th century women’s equality drive, wrote Man’s World, Women’s Place (1971) and Powers of the Weak (1980)
• October 7, 1920 (1994) – Kathryn Clarenback, founding member of the National Organization for Women, executive director of the National Committee on the Observance of International Women’s Year (1977)
• October 8, 1881 (1981) – Esther Lape, championed U.S. participation in the Permanent Court of International Justice, which failed by 7 votes in the Senate (1935), worked for compulsory health insurance, which was supported by Presidents Truman and Eisenhower but defeated by the AMA
• October 9, 1823 (1893) – Mary Shadd Cary, first black woman editor in North America, “Provincial Freeman” (1853) in Windsor, Canada, helped black freed slaves know their rights
• October 9, 1884 (1982) – Helene Deutsch, psychoanalyst, wrote 2-volume The Psychology of Women (1944-45) with emphasis on motherhood
• October 9, 1892 (1992) – Abigail Eliot, founding member of the National Association for Nursery Education (1933), helped monitor quality and establish standards
• October 10, 1888 (1980) – Dorothy Ferebee, finally gained medical internship at Freedman’s Hospital despite rampant sexism, then built a 47-year association with Howard University hospital and the District of Columbia
• October 10, 1900 (1993) – Helen Hayes, actress and “First Lady of the Stage,” began in stock companies, at 17 starred as Pollyanna, in 1930s starred as Mary Queen of Scotland and Queen Victoria, won first Tony award in 1947
• October 11, 1884 (1962) – Eleanor Roosevelt, civil rights advocate, feminist, author, world diplomat, former First Lady (1933-45)
• October 12, 1908 (1997) – Ann Petry, reporter for African-American newspapers in 1930s, wrote The Street, first African-American novel to sell more than a million copies (1946)
• October 12, 1916 (1994) – Alice Childress, actress, “Anna Lacasta” (1944), playwright, “A Hero Ain’t Nothin’ But A Sandwich” (1973)
• October 13, c.1754 (1832) – Mary Hays McCauley, “Molly Pitcher” of the Battle of Monmouth (1778), legendary water-carrying heroine of the American Revolution
• October 13, 1897 (1979) – Edith Sampson, lawyer, first black American to be appointed as a United Nations delegate, first to be elected U.S. circuit judge
• October 14, 1893 (1993) – Lillian Gish, consummate actress, from one-reelers like “An Unseen Enemy” (1912) to “The Whales of August” (1987), wrote Lillian Gish, the Movies, Mr. Griffith, and Me (1969)
• October 15, 1906 (1976) – Victoria Spivey, record producer, blues singer in 1920s, played a featured role in “Hallelujah”(1920), which had an all-black cast
• October 16, 1895 (1989) – Marguerite Rawalt, lawyer, president of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women (1954-56), supporter of the ERA and entire feminist agenda, particularly including the word “sex” in Title VII of Civil Rights Act of 1964
• October 16, 1925 – Angela Lansbury, actress with an 80-year career in movies from “Gaslight” (1944) to television and stage
• October 17, 1918 (1987) – Rita Hayworth, actress, began movies as dancing partner of Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly, made “Gilda” (1946), became femme fatale name for the atomic bomb on the Bikini atoll
• October 17, 1943 – Vilma Socorro Martinez, lawyer, first female U.S. Ambassador to Argentina (2009), civil rights crusader, one of first women on the board of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund
• October 18, 1889 (1968) – Fannie Hurst, author, wrote 17 novels and 9 volumes of short stories over 50 years, left approximately one million dollars each to Brandeis and Washington Universities for professorships in creative literature
• October c.18, 1890 (1986) – Pauline Newman, labor leader who emigrated from Lithuania (1901), aided uprising of the 20,000 in New York, hailed by Coalition of Labor Union Women as a foremother of the liberation movement
• October 18, 1898 (1981) – Lotte Lenya, singer and actress, interpreted and promoted Kurt Weill’s music, especially “The Threepenny Opera”
• October 18, 1917 (1983) – Mamie Clark, psychologist, established the Northside Center for Child Development (1946) with husband, Dr. Kenneth Clark, for the mental hygiene of the whole child
• October 18, 1947 (1997) – Laura Nyro, popular singer and songwriter, melded R&B, pop, doo-wop, jazz and Broadway
• October 18, 1951 – Terry McMillan, author of 13 novels including her first, Mama (1987), and most popular, Waiting to Exhale (1992)
• October 18, 1956 – Martina Navratilova, tennis champion, 9 time Wimbledon singles winner
• October 19, 1891 (1984) – Lois Meek Stolz, first president of Education of Young Children, (1929-31), urged Works Progress Administration to establish nursery schools
• October 22, 1834 (1915) – Abigail Scott Duniway, early western author and Pacific Northwest suffrage leader, (1871-1915), succeeded in winning woman suffrage in Oregon (1912), wrote Path Breaking (1914)
• October 22, 1919 – Doris Lessing, author, born in Iran, Nobel Laureate in 2007
• October 23, 1866 (1954) – Ethel Dummer, provided funds to establish the Juvenile Psychopathic Institute in Chicago (1909) to study juvenile offenders
• October 23, 1889 (1957) – Frieda Fromm-Reichmann, major pioneer using therapeutic relationships in treating mental illness at Chestnut Lodge in Rockville, Maryland (1935-57)
• October 23, 1906 (1996) – Miriam Gideon, composer of approximately 70 works including “The Hound of Heaven” (1945), developed more atonal pieces for voice and instruments after beginning with a more conservative tonal style
• October 23, 1906 (2003) – Gertrude Ederle, first woman to swim the English Channel (1926)
• October 23, 1911 (1999) – Martha Roundtree, creator and first moderator (1945-54) of televised show of unrehearsed panel interviews, “Meet the Press”
• October 24, 1830 (1917) – Belva Lockwood, attorney, first woman admitted to practice law before Supreme Court (1879), ran for U.S. President in 1884 and 1888
• October 24, 1896 (1994) – Marjorie Joyner, helped develop and manage more than 200 Madam C. J. Walker beauty schools by 1919, added professional status to the occupation, worked with Eleanor Roosevelt and other leaders in civil rights struggles
• October 24, 1915 (1976) – Letitia Woods Brown, pioneer in researching and teaching African-American history, completed Ph.D. at Harvard in 1966, primary consultant for the Schlesinger Library’s Black Women Oral History Project, co-authored Washington from Banneker to Douglass 1791-1870
• October 24, 1923 (1997) – Denise Levertov, poet, her anti-Vietnam war poems included themes of destruction by greed, racism, and sexism in the 1970s, her later poetry recovered from despair
• October 25, 1894 (1985) – Marjorie Phillips, artist, embraced techniques of Van Gogh and Cezanne, introduced modern art to the Phillips Gallery as associate director of her husband’s Washington D.C. museum
• October 25, 1912 (1996) – Minnie Pearl, Southern vaudeville circuit performer, joined “The Grand Ole Opry” in 1940 and stayed for 50 years
• October 26, 1911 (1972) – Mahalia Jackson, internationally acclaimed gospel singer, sang at the 1963 March on Washington
• October 26, 1947 – Hillary Clinton, U.S. Secretary of State (2009-13), Senator from New York (2001-09), former First Lady (1993-2001)
• October 27, 1908 (1954) – Lee Krasner, artist, the Works Progress Federal Art Project in 1930s and 40s enabled her to exhibit her paintings and collages in New York and London, also aided the art and career of her husband, Jackson Pollock
• October 27, 1940 – Maxine Hong Kingston, award-winning author of The Woman Warrior, an autobiography about the Chinese-American female experience
• October 28, 1842 (1932) – Anna Dickinson, orator, early champion of the rights of women and blacks, supported interracial marriage, attacked the double standard of morality
• October 28, 1897 (1981) – Edith Head, Hollywood costume designer, first successes were Clara Bow and Mae West, won academy awards for “The Heiress,” “Delilah,” and “The Sting” (1973)
• October 29, 1908 (1996) – Louise Bates Ames, child psychologist, researched and stressed normal steps in development, wrote popular newspaper advice column in 1960s
• October 30, 1864 (1953) – Elizabeth Coolidge, endowed first pension fund for Chicago Symphony Orchestra (1916), funded Lucy Sprague Mitchell’s Bureau of Educational Experiments, established a foundation at the Library of Congress (1925) that provided for the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Auditorium because ” music must be brought to life in performance”
• October 30, 1896 (1985) – Ruth Gordon, actor, one of the Lost Boys in “Peter Pan,” with Garson Kanin wrote comedies for Hepburn and Tracy movies, starred as Dolly Levi in “The Matchmaker” (1954)
• October 31, 1860 (1927) – Juliette Low, founder and first president of the Girl Scouts of the U.S.A.
• October 31, 1896 (1977) – Ethel Waters, singer, recorded more than 250 sides after debut (1921), unsurpassed vocalist and stylist with perfect pitch
• October 31, 1896 (1984) – Lutah Riggs, architect of both country estates and modest homes, advocate of preserving historic buildings
• October 31, 1906 (1996) – Louise Talma, composer, first American woman to receive the Sibelius Medal, taught music theory and musicianship at Hunter College for 51 years

http://www.nwhp.org/news/october.php

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Voters Registration at JCC

JCC has an opportunity for us to assist with registering voters at the college.

WHAT: Voter Registration
WHERE: JCC, Watertown – Commons area & or Building 3 locations
WHEN: September 16 – Next Tuesday!
TIME: 9:00 – 5:00 PM

AAUW members can “person” a table from 10 – 11:30 0r 3:00 – 5:00 pm. If you can’t make those specific times and still want to help, you can choose your time and be paired with a JCC student between the hours of 9:00 – 5:00 pm.

In the interest of time, please email Tom Wojcikowski directly if you are interested in volunteering. twojcikowski@sunyjefferson.edu – also included in the cc of this email.

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“Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention – SHARP” Event

Our next AAUW Jefferson County Branch Event will be held at the Flower Memorial Library in Watertown, NY on September 23, 2014 from 6:30 to 8:00pm.

Let’s learn and discuss more about “Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention” (SHARP). A team of experts from the Fort Drum 10th Mountain Division SHARP Program will be there.

Light refreshments will be provided.

Click on the link to view the flyer:
Sharp Event – Sept 23th 2014

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Sunday, September 14th – “THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL”

Our movie at Ives Hill Retirement Center on Sunday September 14, 2014 at 2PM will be “The Grand Budapest Hotel”.
grandbudapest
“THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL” This 2014 comedy recounts the adventures of Gustave H, a legendary concierge at a famous European hotel between the wars, and Zero Moustafa, the lobby boy who becomes his most trusted friend. The story involves the theft and recovery of a priceless Renaissance painting and the battle for an enormous family fortune — all against the back-drop of a suddenly and dramatically changing Continent.

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September in Women’s History

September Highlights in US Women’s History

  • September 12, 1910 – Alice Stebbins Wells, a former social worker, becomes the first woman police officer with arrest powers in the U.S. (Los Angeles, CA)
  • September 14, 1964 – Helen Keller receives the Presidential Medal of Freedom along with 4 other women: Dr. Lena Edwards, Lynn Fontainne, Dr. Helen Taussig, and Leontyne Price
  • September 14, 1975 – Elizabeth Ann Seton is canonized and becomes the first American-born saint, founded the first U.S. Order of the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph
  • September 17, 1787 – the delegates to the Constitutional Convention met for the last time to sign the document they had created
  • September 20, 1973 – Billie Jean King defeats Bobby “No-Broad-Can-Beat-Me” Riggs in the battle of the sexes tennis match
  • September 25, 1981 - Sandra Day O’Connor is sworn in as the first woman U.S. Supreme Court Justice
  • September 26, 1971 - Shirley Chisholm (D-New York) announces she will enter the Democratic presidential primaries
  • September 26, 1973 – Capt. Lorraine Potter, an American Baptist minister, becomes the first woman U.S. Air Force chaplain
  • September 29, 1988 - Stacy Allison becomes first American woman to reach the summit of Mt. Everest

September Birthdays

  • September 1, 1896 (1987) – Mary Jones, a pioneer in the field of behavior therapy and a celebrated developmental psychologist, her famous patient was a small boy who was terrified of his stuffed white rabbit and gradually overcame his fear with rewards of food
  • September 1, 1909 (1999) – Hildegard Peplau, a nurse educator, created the foundation for modern nursing in her 1952 book, Interpersonal Relations in Nursing, enlisted in the Army Nurse Corps in World War II, served in England and New York and then in the New York Women’s Disturbed Service, president of American Nurses Association, 1970-72
  • September 1, 1933 (2006) – Ann Richards, second woman elected governor of Texas (1990)
  • September 1, 1939 - Lily Tomlin, beginning in the 1960s, a major force in American comedy on television (“Laugh-In,”) Broadway, and in the movies
  • September 2, 1948 (1986) – Christa McAuliffe, New Hampshire teacher, selected in 1985 to be the first teacher in space, died aboard space shuttle Challenger
  • September 3, 1910 (1996) – Dorothy Maynor, operatic soprano of mixed ethnic heritage, sang German lieder as well as spirituals, sang at the inaugurations of Presidents Truman and Eisenhower
  • September 3, 1914 (1984) – Dixy Lee Ray, marine biologist whose scientific papers and research on marine invertebrates led to public television programs, appointment to the Atomic Energy Commission (1973-75), and election as Governor of Washington on conservative issues in 1976
  • September 3, 1920 (1966) – Marguerite Higgins, first woman to win Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting (1951) for coverage of the Korean War
  • September 3, 1921 (1985) – Ruth Orkin, denied admission to the Cinematographer’s Union because she was a woman, went to New York where she filmed a street-scene series and then to Florence where she shot “American Girl in Italy” in 1956
  • September 4, 1906 (1988) – Elaine Yoneda, Communist labor organizer with the International Longshoreman’s Union, argued for free day care for women and equal pay for equal work in 1930s, interned in 1942 with her Japanese-American husband because she felt family should stay together
  • September 5, 1914 (1994) – Hannah Wormington, studied and compared American Paleo-Indian artifacts with European anthropological findings, also studied minerals from those areas and eastern Colorado, resistance to women scientists prevented her talents from being utilized but she remained a model for women in interdisciplinary archaeology
  • September 6, 1860 (1935) – Jane Addams, founder of Hull House in Chicago, first major settlement house, first American woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize (1931), suffragist, helped establish American Civil Liberties Union (1920)
  • September 6, 1898 (1998) – Emily Mudd, pioneering marriage counselor and family planning advocate, advised the Kinsey Reports of 1948 and 1953 and reviewed the Masters and Johnson therapy training methods
  • September 6, 1962 – Alice Sebold, found courage to investigate, find and prosecute the man who raped her in 1981, wrote The Lovely Bones in 1981 and edited The Best American Short Stories in 2009
  • September 7, 1892 (1987) – Elizabeth Coit, architect who tackled affordable housing for people of limited means, collected and analyzed information for the Federal Public Housing Authority, developed more than 150 projects
  • September 8, 1859 (1918) – Mary M. Kimball Kehew, union organizer, co-founder of the Union for Industrial Progress (1892), first president of the National Women’s Trade Union League (1903)
  • September 8, 1914 (1985) – Tish Sommers, co-founded the Older Women’s League (OWL – whose motto is, “Don’t Agonize, Organize”) with Laurie Shields in 1982, worked on housing, health, and job training
  • September 8, 1945 (1995) – Esther Rome, with 13 other women, created the Boston Women’s Health Book Collective, the basis for the groundbreaking health manual Our Bodies, Ourselves, which provided accurate information on women’s health
  • September 10, 1890 (1980) – Rose Norwood, powerful speaker and labor organizer from Kiev, Russia, organized the Boston Women’s Trade Union (WTUL), led strikes, organized laundry workers, and served on the advisory board of the NAACP
  • September 11, 1917 (1996) - Jessica (Decca) Mitford, British-born political activist, author of The American Way of Death (1963), lived with Virginia and Clifford Durr and participated in trade-union marches
  • September 14, 1830 (1910) – Emily Edson Briggs, became first woman White House correspondent during Lincoln’s administration, first president of Women’s National Press Association (1882)
  • September 14, 1879 (1966) – Margaret Sanger, pioneer in birth control and sex education, founded predecessor to Planned Parenthood
  • September 14, 1917 (1994) – Joyce Chen, cookbook author, emigrated to Massachusetts from China in 1944, opened authentic North Chinese restaurant in 1958 with immediate success, taught, published the Joyce Chen Cook Book, and hosted the television program “Joyce Chen Cooks”
  • September 15, 1915 (1981) -Fawn Brodie, wrote biographies of Joseph Smith, Sir Richard Burton, and Thomas Jefferson, and a psychobiography of Richard Nixon
  • September 16, 1913 (1995) – Florence Greenberg, founded Sceptor Records, produced successful rock and roll and soul records in 1950s to early 1970s, her Wand Records label promoted Dianne Warwick in the mid-1960s
  • September 17, 1892 (1977) - Katherine White, joined the “New Yorker” in 1925 and worked there until 1957, married E.B. White in 1929, edited Elizabeth Bishop, Peter Taylor, John Updike, Mary McCarthy and others
  • September 18, 1905 (1990) – Greta Garbo, actress, got her start in advertising in 1922, moved to Hollywood in 1925, had her greatest performance in “Camille” in 1936, retired in 1942
  • September 18, 1905 (1993) - Agnes De Mille, dancer, choreographer, pioneer of the American Ballet Theater
  • September 19, 1911 (1996) – Jane Oppenheimer, studied embryos of common minnow or killifish and similarities and differences between fish and avian and amphibian species, sent embryos into space on the 1975 Apollo-Soyuz mission to study the effects of zero gravity on embryonic development, great patron of Philadelphia Orchestra
  • September 20, 1899 (1979) – Anna Strauss, League of Women Voters national president from 1944 to 1950, believed in simplicity, brevity, and consensus building, Truman named her to the Commission on Internal Security and Individual Rights in 1951
  • September 20, 1946 – Judith Baca, Latina visual artist and muralist, community activist
  • September 21, 1898 (1987) – Frances Albrier, disciple of Marcus Garvey, expanded his vision to include black women, organized waiters in Pullman Company, declared “Don’t Buy Where You Can’t Work,” one of first black women welders in 1942
  • September 21, 1923 (1986) - Kim Williams, naturalist, reporter for National Public Radio on organic gardening and “All Things Considered,” 1976-1986, wrote Book of Uncommon Sense in 1986
  • September 22, 1899 (1990) – Elsie Allen, preserved and revitalized the culture of the northern California Pomo Indians who made exquisite baskets from native plants
  • September 23, 1838 (1927) – Victoria Woodhull, feminist, first woman candidate for U.S. President (1872) for the Equal Rights Party, first woman, with her sister Tennessee, to become members of the NY Stock Exchange (1870’s)
  • September 23, 1863 (1954) – Mary Church Terrell, outstanding speaker, first president of National Association of Colored Women (1896), picketed in Washington D.C. for woman suffrage and desegregation
  • September 23, 1899 (1988) – Louise Nevelson, sculptor, migrated from near Kiev to Maine, taught in the Works Progress Administration in 1943, in the 1970s created massive steel works combining cubism and expressionism
  • September 23,1906 (1993) – Harriet Hardy, physician, investigated industrial diseases like beryllium poisoning, worked with Alice Hamilton on lead poising and other diseases, charged academic medicine with greed in not preparing students for careers in occupational medicine
  • September 24, 1902 (1986) – Cheryl Crawford, independent theater producer, starting with “Johnny Johnson” in 1936, her successes included “Porgy and Bess” and “Brigadoon” in 1947
  • September 25, 1903 (1993) – Olive Beech, headed Beech Aircraft Company with husband Walter, trained 90% of all bombardiers in World War II, as widow she diversified products until 1968
  • September 26, 1893 (1976) – Freda Kirchway, prolific political journalist, editor of the “Nation” (and owner 1937-55), espoused women’s concerns for birth control in the 1920s, also worked for the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom
  • September 27, 1895 (1988) – Jennie Matyas, labor organizer and educator who emigrated from Hungarian Transylvania to Manhattan in 1906, supported equal suffrage, worked to enroll black women in the ILGWU, and organized women in San Francisco
  • September 27, 1914 (1983) – Catherine Marshall, inspirational writer who, grieving over the death of her husband, Peter, in 1949, edited his sermons and wrote the elegy, A Man Called Peter, in 1958 married Leonard LeSourd, the inspirational editor of “Guideposts,” who posthumously published many of Catherine’s volumes, including those chronicling her doubts and depressions
  • September 30, 1875 (1951) – Anne Martin, helped win equal suffrage in Nevada, western suffrage leader, became first woman to run for the U.S. Senate in 1918.

http://www.nwhp.org/news/september.php

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AAUW-NYS YouTube Videos – NCCWSL, Cazenovia

Here you can find the links for the videos from the 2014 National Conference for College Women Student Leaders – NCCWSL, in Cazenovia.

 AAUW-NYS’s 2014 NCCWSL Panel – Part 1: Introductions

 Part 1: Introduction. Maria Ellis, AAUW-NYS Membership VP, introduces three 2014 NCCWSL student panelists from NYS and her co-host, Andrea Pedrick, President of the Jefferson County Branch. The students are: Danielle (Dani) Scott (Jefferson Community College), Alyssa McKenzie-Chery (Jefferson Community College), and Chochanmei (Cho) Oo (Utica College).

 NCCWSL, the National Conference for College Women Student Leaders, is where college women make their future what they want. America’s premier conference for college women, NCCWSL prepares attendees to be the next generation of leaders. Nearly 1,000 college women from every state and from around the world all met at the University of Maryland, College Park in June 2014.

 Filmed at the AAUW-NYS Summer Meeting on July 26, 2014 in Cazenovia, NY.

 http://youtu.be/Yz2AvxMrkDo (Intro: 4.51 minutes)

Part 2: NCCWSL Expectations. The panelists discuss their expectations for the conference and how those were met. The panelists are Maria Ellis, AAUW-NYS Membership VP, students Danielle (Dani) Scott (Jefferson Community College), Alyssa McKenzie-Chery (Jefferson Community College), Chochanmei (Cho) Oo (Utica College), and Andrea Pedrick, President of the Jefferson County Branch.

 NCCWSL, the National Conference for College Women Student Leaders, is where college women make their future what they want. America’s premier conference for college women, NCCWSL prepares attendees to be the next generation of leaders. Nearly 1,000 college women from every state and from around the world all met at the University of Maryland, College Park in June 2014.

 Filmed at the AAUW-NYS Summer Meeting on July 26, 2014 in Cazenovia, NY.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpfhsrj-6ZA (Expectations: 6:29 minutes)

Part 3: What Does it Mean to be a Feminist? The panelists discuss their responses to this question as they moved through the NCCWSL weekend. The panelists are Maria Ellis, AAUW-NYS Membership VP, students Danielle (Dani) Scott (Jefferson Community College), Alyssa McKenzie-Chery (Jefferson Community College), Chochanmei (Cho) Oo (Utica College), and Andrea Pedrick, President of the Jefferson County Branch.

 NCCWSL, the National Conference for College Women Student Leaders, is where college women make their future what they want. America’s premier conference for college women, NCCWSL prepares attendees to be the next generation of leaders. Nearly 1,000 college women from every state and from around the world all met at the University of Maryland, College Park in June 2014.

 Filmed at the AAUW-NYS Summer Meeting on July 26, 2014 in Cazenovia, NY.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g-0OCwzQ4BQ   (Feminism: 8:34 minutes)

Part 4: How Will NCCWSL Impact Your Life? The panelists share what they learned and how it will inform their careers as students and in life. The panelists are Maria Ellis, AAUW-NYS Membership VP, students Danielle (Dani) Scott (Jefferson Community College), Alyssa McKenzie-Chery (Jefferson Community College), Chochanmei (Cho) Oo (Utica College), and Andrea Pedrick, President of the Jefferson County Branch.

 NCCWSL, the National Conference for College Women Student Leaders, is where college women make their future what they want. America’s premier conference for college women, NCCWSL prepares attendees to be the next generation of leaders. Nearly 1,000 college women from every state and from around the world all met at the University of Maryland, College Park in June 2014.

 Filmed at the AAUW-NYS Summer Meeting on July 26, 2014 in Cazenovia, NY.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9PDfvzdoYs (Impact: 9:00 minutes)

Part 5: What Policy Issues Will You Focus On? The panelists discuss what public policy issues they will focus on as a result of NCCWSL. The panelists are Maria Ellis, AAUW-NYS Membership VP, students Danielle (Dani) Scott (Jefferson Community College), Alyssa McKenzie-Chery (Jefferson Community College), Chochanmei (Cho) Oo (Utica College), and Andrea Pedrick, President of the Jefferson County Branch.

 NCCWSL, the National Conference for College Women Student Leaders, is where college women make their future what they want. America’s premier conference for college women, NCCWSL prepares attendees to be the next generation of leaders. Nearly 1,000 college women from every state and from around the world all met at the University of Maryland, College Park in June 2014.

 Filmed at the AAUW-NYS Summer Meeting on July 26, 2014 in Cazenovia, NY.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGx77HpiCJo  (PolicyConcerns: 10:31 minutes)

Part 7: How can you Share Your NCCWSL Experience With Your Community? The panelists discuss to engage their campuses and the AAUW community as a result their NCCSWL expereince. The panelists are Maria Ellis, AAUW-NYS Membership VP, students Danielle (Dani) Scott (Jefferson Community College), Alyssa McKenzie-Chery (Jefferson Community College), Chochanmei (Cho) Oo (Utica College), and Andrea Pedrick, President of the Jefferson County Branch.

 NCCWSL, the National Conference for College Women Student Leaders, is where college women make their future what they want. America’s premier conference for college women, NCCWSL prepares attendees to be the next generation of leaders. Nearly 1,000 college women from every state and from around the world all met at the University of Maryland, College Park in June 2014.

 Filmed at the AAUW-NYS Summer Meeting on July 26, 2014 in Cazenovia, NY.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1IC1lutuNM (EngageAAUW)

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Jefferson County AAUW Newsletter – August/September 2014

Click on the link below to view our AAUW Jefferson County Branch Newsletter for August/September 2014.
Hope you enjoy it!
Newsletter August-September_2014

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